eARThworks at the WaterShed Classes

eARTworks at the WaterShed - 2017

The Boise WaterShed Environmental Education Center and the Boise City Arts and History Department are offering another unique series of summer art and science classes for kids (and adults!) created by teams of artists and scientists. Limit: two classes per person. Adult does not need to accompany child. Maximum number of participants per class: 20 (The Dam Story max. participants: 12).

You must REGISTER to attend these classes.

Class Descriptions
  • June 8 - Where the River Begins
    Artist: Amy Nack; Scientist: TBD
    Time: 9:30 – 12:30; CLASS IS FULL
     1:30 – 4:00; ages 11 and older

    From a high rugged place in the Sawtooth Range, the Boise River begins. In this class we’ll delve into the importance of the river’s beginnings. We’ll symbolize the labyrinth of headwater streams by creating an abstract work of art using a palette of colors reflected in the Boise River.

  • June 13 - Insect Hotels
    Artist: TBD; Scientist: Mary Lugg
    Time: 9:30 – 12:30; CLASS IS FULL
     1:30 – 4:00; ages 11 and older

    What can we do about the plight of pollinators? Insects such as bees, butterflies and other pollinator populations are declining due to loss of habitat and other impacts. In this class, we’ll build “Insect Hotels”, places for pollinators to call home. Each student will take home an “Insect Hotel” to hang in their garden, becoming a steward of our local pollinator population.

  • June 15 - Cottonwood Trees, our watershed guardians
    Artist: Rachel Murphy; Scientist: Debbie Cook
    Time: 9:30 – 12:30; ages 5 - 10, parents may register also
    1:30 – 4:00; ages 11 and older

    We’ll explore the cottonwood tree, standing tall along our river, and the network of beneficial connections it creates for the aquatic ecosystem. Our art project will demonstrate the layered system of ecological benefits cottonwoods provide. Students will see how overlapping layers can deepen and add interest in an arts piece.

  • June 20 - The Dam Story
    Artist: Mike Shipman; Scientist: TBD
    Time: 9:30 – 12:30; ages 5 - 10, parents may register also
     1:30 – 4:00; ages 11 and older

    Class limit: 12 students

Our topic of investigation is dams: the benefits they give us, the problems they cause, and the connections they create and cut from here to the ocean.Using the new River Campus public art installation, Fluxion by Byron Folwell, we’ll talk about how the artist interpreted the human managed system of Lucky Peak Reservoir and Dam. We’ll also review the components of a good photograph. The artist help us combine mediums: we’ll illustrate the photographs with a hand-drawn, transparent overlay showing our individual responses to the benefits and problems of the many dams that manage our river water flow.

  • June 22 - Birds that Fish
    Artist:
    Drew Williams; Scientist: Heidi Ware
    Time: 9:30 – 12:30; ages 5 - 10, parents may register also
    1:30 – 4:00; ages 11 and older

Fish have it tough. People wade into rivers with rods and hooks and flies seeking both fun and dinner. But fish are prey for more than people. Birds, too, have developed strategies to catch fish for food. Here at the Boise WaterShed we have many birds of prey, each with its own set of adaptations. In the art workshop, students will capture the remarkable characteristics of birds that fish in a mixed media work of art. This mixed media collage will allow us to explore elements of art such as color, line, and texture.

  • June 29 - Tracks and the stories they tell
    Artist:
    Deana Atteberry; Scientist: Ray Vizgirdas
    Time: 9:30 – 12:30; CLASS IS FULL
    1:30 – 4:00; ages 11 and older

    Do you like to read a good mystery book? In this class we’ll use the ground as a manuscript filled with clues about animal life. We’ll learn about the art and science of tracking with expert tracker Ray Vizgirdas and his assistant Jay, a wonderful, 4-legged class surprise! Ray brings over 30 years of experience as a field biologist and naturalist and has authored several books on ecology and ethnobotany. After we delve into the art of tracking, we’ll switch to the art of leather stamping. We’ll learn about professional leather working tools, and then use them to create beautifully stamped works that tell a tracking story. Students will make both a stamped leather bookmark and a leather piece that can be framed.

  • July 6 - How Tough are Trout
    Artist:
    Steven Douglas; Scientist: Ryan Peck
    Time:
    9:30 – 12:30; CLASS IS FULL
     1:30 – 4:00; ages 11 and older

You can tell when someone is sick. They look and act unwell. The same is true of a trout stream or lake. We’ll investigate the environmental preferences of trout and determine the formula for their healthy environmental conditions. To extend our knowledge about trout, we’ll observe their world through artists’ eyes. A professional artist will draw us into the world of abstract painting. Each student will create two 6” x 12” acrylic paintings that not only demonstrate an understanding of trout, but also the new skills of perspective, color theory, refraction, and the use of tools other than brushes for applying paint.

  • July 20 - Raptors and Rodents
    Artist:
    Renda Palmer; Scientist: Mary Lugg
    Time:
    9:30 – 12:30; ages 5 - 10, parents may register also
    1:30 – 4:00; ages 11 and older

Birds of prey have excellent eyesight. They can see two to eight times better than humans. As top predators, raptors play an important role in maintaining balance in the natural world. We’ll see how this balance is important not just for wildlife, but for people too. Our art project will focus on raptors’ eyes. We’ll each create a drawing using markers and watercolor pencils. Attention will focus on simple shapes, line, texture, and color.

 


Brought to you by the City of Boise